healthcare

One Set Of Jobs Is Expanding Faster Than Any Others:

Those In The Care Sector

As demographics shift, with many countries facing aging populations, and cultural norms evolve, with more women entering the workplace, the demand for care is on the up. So-called “care” professions include childcare, eldercare, nursing, therapy, personal training and career coaching.

Almost 40% of all projected job opportunities in emerging professions will be created in the care sector between 2020 and 2023, according to a report on the jobs of tomorrow from the World Economic Forum.

  • Shifting demographics are leading to an uptick in jobs in the care sector, according to a new report.
  • Almost 40% of projected job opportunities in emerging professions are being created in the care economy.
  • Care professions include childcare, eldercare, nursing, therapy and personal trainers.
  • More work needs to be done to ensure these jobs are high-skilled and properly compensated.

“The growing demand for care services has the potential to generate significant job opportunities, while boosting labour force integration for informal caregivers and supporting new, more flexible ways of working,” according to a Forum white paper. “While care jobs are already a growing occupational sector, more work still needs to be done to ensure these jobs are high-skilled and fairly compensated.”

Ensuring there is adequate supply to meet demand for care has the potential to create millions of new jobs around the world, it said.

Care is one area where jobs are likely to be created, setting it against a wider trend in the labour market. More broadly, the world is facing a ‘double-disruption’ scenario, according to the Forum’s Future of Jobs 2020 report, as automation and the coronavirus redefine work.

While each country around the world has different demographics and differing needs, many have great care requirements.

The US, for example, has an aging population, with the share of those aged 65 or over expected to grow to 21% by 2050, from around 15% in 2015. Of those, about 70% will need “some sort of long-term care” during their lives, the Forum white paper said.

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